Zadara Blog

News, information, opinion and commentary on issues affecting enterprise data storage and management.

Bring Cold Object Storage to Your Private Cloud

In today’s computing environment, more and more companies are beginning to work with massive datasets, ranging into the hundreds of petabytes and beyond. Whether it’s big data analytics, high-definition video, or internet-of-things applications, the necessity for companies to handle large amounts of data in their daily operations continues to grow.

Historically, enterprises have managed their data as a hierarchy of files. But this approach is simply inadequate for efficiently handling the huge datasets that are becoming more and more common today. For example, public cloud platforms, such as Amazon Web Services (AWS) and Microsoft Azure, that must service many thousands of users simultaneously, would quickly become intolerably unresponsive if every user data request meant having to traverse the folders and subfolders of multiple directory trees to find and collect the information needed for a response.

That’s why modern public cloud platforms, and other users of big data, use object storage in place of older file systems. And as the use of private clouds grows, they too are employing object storage to meet the challenges of efficiently handling large amounts of data.

big data word cloud

What Is Object Storage?

With object storage, there is no directory tree or folders. Instead, there is a flat global namespace that allows each unit of stored data, called an object, to be directly addressed.

Each object contains not only data, but also metadata that describes the data, and a global ID number that uniquely identifies that object. This allows every object in the storage system, no matter where it might be physically stored, to be quickly retrieved simply by providing its unique identifier.

Why Object Storage is Well Suited To Private Clouds

When it comes to handling massive datasets in a cloud environment, object storage has a number of unique advantages. Let’s take a look at some of these:

  • It’s infinitely scalable. Because of its flat namespace, an object storage system can theoretically be scaled without limitation simply by adding objects, each with its own unique ID.
  • Metadata makes searching easy. The metadata that accompanies each object provides critical information about the object’s data, making it easy to search for and retrieve needed data quickly and efficiently without having to analyze the data itself.
  • It’s highly robust and reliable. The VPSA Object Storage differs from a traditional RAID redundant storage using a distributed “Ring” topology policy under the hood.  Zadara Object store allows for a 2-way or 3-way replication as options which the customers can choose at creation time. By the use of erasure coding (instead of RAID) to achieve continuous and efficient replication of data across multiple nodes, an object storage system automatically backs data up, and can quickly rebuild data that is destroyed or corrupted. Nodes can be added or removed at will, and the system uses Swift’s underlying Ring replication to ensure that new objects are incorporated, or removed ones are rebuilt, automatically and transparently.
  • It simplifies storage management. The metadata of an object can contain as much (or as little) information about the data as desired. For example, it could specify where the object is to be stored, which applications will use it, the date when it should be deleted, or what level of data security is required. Having this degree of detail available for every object allows much of the data management task to be automated in software.
  • It lowers costs. Object storage systems don’t require expensive specialized storage appliances, but are designed for use with low-cost commodity disk drives.

storage arrays in cloud

Zadara VPSA Object Storage

Zadara offers an object storage solution that incorporates all the advantages discussed above, and then some. VPSA Object Storage is specifically designed for use with private as well as public clouds. It is especially suited to storing relatively static data such as big data or multimedia files, or for archiving data of any type. VPSA Object Storage provides anytime, anywhere, any-device remote access (with appropriate access controls) via HTTP.

The VPSA Object Storage solution, which is Amazon S3 and OpenStack Swift compatible, features frequent, incremental, snapshot-based, automatic data backup to object-based storage, eliminating the need to have separate backup software running on the host.

If you would like to explore how Zadara VPSA Object Storage can help boost your company’s private cloud, please contact us.

October 10, 2017

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Practical Benefits Of A Hybrid Cloud Strategy

As more and more companies move to the cloud, one of the first questions they have to answer is which cloud model best fits their needs: public, private, or hybrid. Many are choosing the hybrid model as their best option.

The term “hybrid cloud” simply refers to an operational environment that includes both private and public cloud platforms. It has become an attractive model for many enterprises because it allows users to take advantage of the cost and functionality advantages of the public cloud, while also gaining the flexibility and control a private cloud provides.

Let’s take a quick look at some of the unique benefits of a hybrid cloud strategy.

Flexibility to Determine Optimal Placement of Workloads

With a hybrid cloud, administrators can decide where to place each workload to maximize efficiency and minimize costs.

The distinctive characteristic of the public cloud is its ability to provide IT services on demand without requiring up-front capital investments for hardware and infrastructure. With its XaaS (“Whatever you need”-as-a-Service) model, public cloud platforms, such as Microsoft Azure, Amazon Web Services (AWS), or Google Cloud Platform (GCP), have become excellent vehicles for quickly deploying common applications that many companies depend on.

Whether it’s a CRM (customer relationship management) or ERM (enterprise resource management) application, or perhaps a document management environment such as Office 365, companies can institute such workloads on a public cloud platform quickly and cost-effectively.

Yet many organizations also have workloads that are better served in an on-premises environment than in the public cloud. For example, workloads that require very high levels of I/O responsiveness, such as big data analytics, may be affected by public cloud latency issues that could degrade system performance to unacceptable levels. By housing such workloads in a company’s on-premises private cloud, where storage and servers can be kept in close physical proximity to one another, latency effects can be minimized.

Control of Data and Applications

The public cloud is a multi-tenant environment in which resources are shared among a number of customers. Many companies, concerned about the possibility of their workloads somehow being affected by the activities of other users, prefer to keep their mission-critical applications at home in a private cloud, under their direct control, while offloading less critical workloads to the public cloud.

Data Placement to Meet Security Requirements

Data security keys

Data security is the number one reason for the use of private clouds. Although public cloud platforms can now provide very high levels of data protection, many organizations believe that their most sensitive data is less vulnerable when it is kept at home behind their own firewall. This is particularly true for companies in industries, such as healthcare or banking, that are subject to regulatory compliance mandates that specify how customer information must be kept secure.

On the other hand, less sensitive data that becomes inactive or infrequently used can be moved to public cloud storage to take advantage of lower costs and greater scalability.

Speed of Testing and Deploying New Applications

Many companies use both public and private clouds in the testing and deployment of new applications. The design parameters of new apps can be shaped, refined, and thoroughly tested using a public cloud PaaS (Platform-as-a-Service) offering. Because PaaS resources are virtualized, developers can call them in as needed without having to spend capital funds to purchase hardware. Then, once development and testing are complete, the application can be deployed to a public or private cloud for production.

Spillover of Non-Critical Data to the Public Cloud

keyboard in clouds

Many hybrid cloud implementations are specifically designed to allow seamless failover to the public cloud should the operations of an organization’s private cloud be disrupted for any reason. This is especially true in the area of data backup/restore and disaster recovery. Once the emergency has passed, operations can be returned to the private cloud environment, often without users ever being aware that the failure occurred.

This is also the idea behind “cloud bursting,” which is instituted when surges in demand outpace the capacity of a private cloud. Whether it’s pre-planned, perhaps in anticipation of seasonal spikes in traffic, or is the entirely unexpected result of some news event that suddenly drives increased traffic to a company’s website, non-sensitive data can be temporarily spilled over into the public cloud so that operations can continue without disruption.

The Zadara Hybrid Cloud Storage Solution

The Zadara Storage Cloud has proven to be a highly effective storage solution for hybrid cloud implementations. Zadara VPSA Storage Arrays are connected to major cloud providers like AWS, Azure, and GCP. They can also be housed on customer premises as the storage component of a private cloud. With their remote replication and mirroring capabilities, these devices can transparently transfer stored data between clouds to facilitate failover, spillover, backup/restore, and disaster recovery.

Zadara VPSA Storage Arrays are provided on a storage-as-a-service (STaaS) basis. No matter how many may be installed on site, customers pay only a monthly fee for just the amount of storage they actually use during the billing period.

If you’d like to explore how Zadara Storage can assist your company in developing a cost-effective hybrid cloud implementation, please download the ‘Zadara Storage Cloud’ whitepaper.

September 26, 2017

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Why Companies Adopt Both Public and Private Clouds

More and more companies are basing significant portions of their IT infrastructure in the cloud. According to the RightScale 2017 State of the Cloud Survey of IT professionals, a full 95 percent of respondents said that their companies have adopted the cloud as an integral part of their IT operations. For some of those companies, the focus is on the public cloud; for others it’s on an in-house private cloud. The majority make use of both public and private clouds.

What is it about public and private clouds that causes so many companies to be drawn to them? Let’s take a look at the benefits each of these cloud models offer to businesses today.

The Benefits of the Cloud

It was not that long ago that the standard approach to IT in most companies was to build and maintain their own in-house datacenters. But the cloud computing model has brought about a fundamental shift in the way businesses seek to meet their IT needs. No longer must companies devote scarce capital (CapEx) funds to the purchase of their own servers, storage, and networking hardware. Instead, the cloud model encourages them to purchase IT services on a pay-as-you-go basis for a monthly fee.

Customers pay only for the services that they actually use. The cloud platform provider is responsible to acquire, support, and upgrade the required hardware and software as necessary, and to ensure that a sufficient amount of these resources is always available to allow on-demand provisioning and scaling. The result is that the cloud model offers companies lower overall costs, greater flexibility and agility, rapid deployment of applications, and a substantial reduction in the amount of expert staff required to manage the organization’s IT infrastructure.

How Public and Private Clouds Differ From One Another

public and private clouds cross streets

Public cloud platforms, such as Amazon Web Services (AWS), Microsoft Azure, and Google Cloud Platform (GCP) are, as the name implies, open to everyone. They operate on a multi-tenancy model in which hardware and software resources are shared among a number of different customers. This allows the public cloud to realize economies of scale that drive down costs for all users.

Private clouds, on the other hand, are built on a single-tenancy model. That means they are devoted exclusively to one customer, and there is no sharing of resources. Private clouds can be implemented either in a company’s on-premises datacenter using its own hardware, in an external facility run by a trusted partner such as a managed services provider (MSP), or even, in some cases, with dedicated resources in the facilities of a public cloud provider. The key is that a private cloud is isolated to a single customer, and there is no intermingling of that customer’s hardware/software resources or data with those of other customers.

Advantages of the Public Cloud

Because of its large multi-tenant user base, a public cloud platform can normally provide IT services at a lower cost than a private cloud could achieve. Costs are also reduced by the fact that customers have no responsibility for purchasing, housing, supporting, or managing hardware. The result is that workloads can be deployed on a public cloud platform more quickly and inexpensively than would be the case with a private cloud.

Advantages of a Private Cloud

cloud in chains protected for data protection

The main driver in the decision of many companies to make use of a private cloud is the desire to retain maximum control over business-critical data. Although public clouds now provide the highest levels of data protection, the multi-tenant nature of such platforms, and the fact that they are designed to allow access by users around the world, presents a level of perceived vulnerability that many companies are not comfortable with. Plus, businesses in certain industries face strict regulatory compliance obligations, such as those imposed by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA). With a private cloud, all of a company’s data can remain safely hidden behind the organization’s own firewall, totally inaccessible to outsiders.

The ability to tailor a private cloud to the exact requirements of a company’s specific workloads may also provide performance advantages over what could be achieved with a public cloud platform.

The Zadara Storage Solution Spans Both Public and Private Cloud Platforms

The Zadara Storage Cloud provides a common storage solution for both public and private clouds. Its VPSA Storage Arrays support each of the major public cloud platforms such as AWS, Azure, and Google Cloud Platform (GCP). They also form the basis of many private cloud implementations. The Zadara Storage architecture also provides resource isolation, so users gain the benefits of multi-tenant public clouds, but with the security and predictable performance of a private cloud. Whether they use the public cloud, a private cloud, or a hybrid combination of the two, Zadara customers receive all the benefits of the cloud model, including paying a monthly fee for just the amount of storage they actually use. And Zadara takes on the responsibility to monitor and support the customer’s storage, whether on-site or in the public cloud.

If you would like to know more about how Zadara can help you develop a comprehensive cloud solution for your company, please download the ‘Zadara Storage Cloud’ whitepaper.

September 13, 2017

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Understanding the Differences in CapEx & OpEx: Enterprise Cloud Storage

Traditionally, IT expenses have fallen under the umbrella of capital expenses, often abbreviated within the finance and accounting industries as CapEx expenses. With the advent of cloud computing, the ‘as a Service’ model of buying software, enterprise cloud storage, and related trends in IT, many organizations are successfully shifting some or all IT expenses to the operational expense ledger, similarly abbreviated as OpEx. There are many differences in CapEx and OpEx, and it’s important to understand these differences whether in accounting or an IT pro.

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September 7, 2016

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True Cost of Enterprise Storage: A TCO Analysis

What’s Today’s Cost of Enterprise Storage?

The cost of enterprise storage depends on who you ask.

Traditional storage providers such as NetApp and EMC can cost hundreds of thousands of dollars. It doesn’t matter if it’s purchased upfront or leased, it’s still a huge capital expenditure.

However, many companies (cloud providers) offer a software-based solution where it becomes an operating expense where you pay as you go. While this is a wonderful cost-effective solution, it may leave you without some of the traditional enterprise-grade features that you have come to rely on.

Many storage and IT managers are hesitant to migrate their data to the cloud for a couple common reasons — performance and security being at the top of that list. Wouldn’t it be great if there were an OpEx-based storage solution that still had the performance, security and other enterprise-grade features that are associated with traditional storage?

cost-of-enterprise-storage

Agility, Flexibility, and Enterprise Grade Features (without Capital Expenditures)

Zadara Storage offers Storage-as-a-Service (STaaS) through a complete, universal storage solution. Our business model is OpEx-based so you only pay for the storage you use. If you need 200TB today, and only 25TB tomorrow, no problem; you can scale up and down as needed with us, and we’ll only charge you based on your usage. By switching to an OpEx model, we’ve had customers save up to 85% of their storage costs.

Additionally, we offer all the enterprise-grade features that you’re used to such as cloning, mirroring, snapshots, DR, and more. We support all data types (block, file, and object), any protocol (Fibre Channel, iSCSI, iSER, NFS, CIFS, S3, Swift) and in any location (Cloud, Hybrid and On-Premise).

As far as security goes, we offer both in-flight and at-rest data encryption where the user owns the keys. Only you have access to your data. Worried about performance issues in the cloud? Download our white paper ‘Getting Great Storage Performance in the Cloud’ or read our case study to see how Netrepid increased their performance by 80%.

 

Predicting the Future: If we only had a crystal ball

Despite the cost and uncertainty of the future, businesses are still over-paying for their storage needs and wiping out their entire department’s budget. Even with growth rate predictions, there’s no true way to tell exactly how much storage capacity a business will need in 6 months, 12 months, 2 years or 5 years. Inevitably, users must choose between over-provisioning storage and wasting money or not purchasing enough and being unable to satisfy demand.

Let’s Talk Savings

storage-cost-analysis

By using our customized TCO calculator, we can look at your specific environment and estimate how much you could save using an OpEx solution vs. a CapEx solution.   

 

Status Quo vs. ROI: The Next Storage Battleground

Interested in learning more? Join us on August 17th at 11:00am PST for a webinar that goes into further detail about the cost-effectiveness of an OpEx, Storage-as-a-Service solution.

Click here to sign up.

August 9, 2016

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The True “Cost” of Enterprise Storage – A Different Approach

In the first part of this blog I reviewed some of the new operational challenges that have to be undertaken to ensure that storage runs smoothly, and their ensuing costs.

In this blog, I’ll be looking at how Zadara Storage have taken a different approach to both cloud and on-premises storage with the VPSA (Virtual Private Storage Array).

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September 29, 2015

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The True “Cost” of Enterprise Storage – Understanding Storage Management

It’s definitely a truism that the absolute cost of storage, measured per GB has continued to drop steadily over the last 15 years. In fact, when I was involved in purchasing storage hardware it was common to put in place a quarterly price reduction of around 5% on any long-term deals. Prices have dropped over time because the disk manufacturers have been able to continue to increase the capacity of data stored in a standard drive form-factor, delivering more capacity for the same physical amount of space, power and cooling.

Continue reading The True “Cost” of Enterprise Storage – Understanding Storage Management

September 28, 2015

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The True “Cost” of Enterprise Storage – Understanding Storage Management

It’s definitely a truism that the absolute cost of storage, measured per GB has continued to drop steadily over the last 15 years. In fact, when I was involved in purchasing storage hardware it was common to put in place a quarterly price reduction of around 5% on any long-term deals. Prices have dropped over time because the disk manufacturers have been able to continue to increase the capacity of data stored in a standard drive form-factor, delivering more capacity for the same physical amount of space, power and cooling.

Continue reading The True “Cost” of Enterprise Storage – Understanding Storage Management

September 28, 2015

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